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An Approach To:

Vol. 19 No. 2 (2021)

Approach to: Pediatric urinary tract infection (UTI)

DOI
https://doi.org/10.26443/mjm.v19i1.312
Submitted
September 27, 2020
Published
2021-07-12

Abstract

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are prevalent in the children. Presentation of UTI vary in children of different ages. In infants, who cannot localize symptoms, UTI can present with a fever whereas in older children a UTI can present with urinary symptoms (dysuria, urinary frequency, incontinence). It is important to establish a clear diagnosis in order to treat and resolve the infection with antibiotics therapy to prevent bacteremia, pyelonephritis, and long-tern renal disease. Urine is collected through a mid-stream urine sample, in toilet trained children, via urethral catheterization, suprapubic aspiration and pediatric urine collection bags. Urine analysis and culture are the first-line investigations in children with suspected UTI. Goals of treatment include elimination of infection, relief of acute symptoms, and prevention of recurrent and long-term complications. The Canadian Pediatric Society recommends initial treatment with oral antibiotics for nontoxic children with febrile UTIs. Imaging, such as a renal/bladder ultrasound, may be used.

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